Category: Digital Public History

Per il 71° anniversario della Resistenza italiana (2016), riparliamo di “Firenze in Guerra 1940-1944”, la Mostra del 70° anniversario (2015) ospitata a Palazzo Medici-Riccardi

Mostra per il 70° della Resistenza Italiana, Palazzo Medici Riccardi, ottobre 2014-gennaio 2015 e 25 Aprile – 28 Giugno 2015 e sito Web della Mostra: 1940-1944 – FIRENZE IN GUERRA – http://www.firenzeinguerra.com/

Catalogo della Mostra a cura di Francesca Cavarocchi e Valeria Galimi: Firenze in Guerra, 1940-1944. Catalogo della mostra storico-documentaria. (Palazzo Medici Riccardi, ottobre 2014-gennaio 2015)., Firenze: Firenze University Press, 2014.

A “Memoria e Ricerca” roundtable stresses absence of Public History in David Armitage & Jo Guldi “History Manifesto”

There is a widespread feeling that public funds and private sponsorship should be used for what –many people think– matters in society. Economists, for example, enjoy broad acceptance as public mediators and interpreters of our contemporary world. University programs in the Humanities, by contrast, are facing a worldwide crisis. In Japan departments are closing and this also means that the Humanities are facing an identity crisis. Such a crisis is acute in the USA where, in order to maintain university programmes, you have to provide an answer to the «What for?» question and prove immediate relevance for the job market and society at large.

Digital Public History Narratives with Photographs

Social Media are “a group of Internet-based applications that build on the ideological and technological foundations of Web 2.0, and that allow the creation and exchange of user-generated content.”[1] They facilitate various forms of web communication between individuals and communities. They can bring users together to discuss common issues and to share traces of the past. Local communities’ engagement with the past, mediated or not, are made possible through Web 2.0 practices. New virtual contacts could be built when communities are no longer present in physical spaces.[2]

Définir le champ de l’Histoire Publique Numérique, un atelier à THATCamp Paris 2015

Un atelier proposé pour THATCamp Paris a été voté par les participants à la “unconference” et s’est donc tenu le mercredi 10 Juin 2015 à 9 heures du matin. J’avais proposé -en mon nom et au nom de Mark Tebeau- l’atelier que Frédéric Clavert, un des organisateurs de THATcamp Paris, membre du THATCamp Council, a présenté en notre nom, mardi 9 juin au public quand, ni Mark ni moi n’étions encore à Paris. L’atelier portait sur la définition du champ de la Digital Public History (DPH) ou, en français, Histoire Publique Numérique.